The Impact of FDR and How He Saved the World with Prof. Bernard Bellush

August 30, 2017

Wednesday, January 30, 2008, at 12:00 Noon, I am hosting my show “The Advocates” on WVOX- 1460 AM Today’s topic is about our 32nd President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whose birthday was on this date in 1882. The topic is the “Impact of FDR, and How He Saved America and the World.” 

My guest today is Mr. Bernard Bellush, who currently resides with his wife Jewel in Valhalla, NY. He is the author of the scholarly work, “Franklin D. Roosevelt as Governor of New York,” which was published by the Columbia University Press in 1955. Mr. Bellush was a professor at City College in New York City. Mr. Bellush, in writing this unique book, came into contact with some of the intellectual giants of that era, which include Allan Nevins, Herman Kahn, Richard B. Morris, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and Frank Freidel, one of FDR’s greatest biographers.

 As of this past November, Professor Bellush turned 90 years old. He was born, raised and educated in New York City’s great public schools as well as its outstanding City College. He took 3 years off from his graduate work at Columbia University to be further educated by the Army of the USA. Part of that experience involved landing on Omaha Beach on D-Day to help set up the first ammunition depot as a Sergeant with the 616th Ordnance Ammunition Company. The GI Bill of Rights, one of the greatest pieces of legislation ever, helped him complete his doctorate at Columbia. His first book, with editorial assistance from his wife Jewel, was “Franklin D. Roosevelt as Governor of New York.”  While teaching at CCNY he authored other books on the NRA, a biography of Governor John G Winant of New Hampshire, and a joint authorship with his wife Jewel “Union Power in New York.” For the last 5 years, he and his wife have been kept busy lecturing at our Senior Community, Westchester Meadows, on Political and Historical subjects.

 

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FDR and the Constitution and the Court with Burt Solomon

August 30, 2017

Wednesday, July 22, 2009, at 12:00 Noon, I am hosting my show, The Advocates on WVOX- 1460 AM,. My guest is Mr. Burt Solomon, author of FDR vs. The Constitution: the Court Packing Fight and the Triumph of Democracy, published by Walker & Company, NY. NY. (Seventy-two years ago on July 22, 1937, the US Senate rejected FDR’s ambitious court plan! But eventually FDR, who had not appointed one Justice, had the opportunity to replace the whole Court!)

Burt Solomon was born and raised in Baltimore, graduated Harvard College in 1970, worked for Texas Observer, Danvers (Mass.) Times, The Real Paper (alternative weekly in Cambridge, Mass.), went around the world 1975-76 when the paper was sold, The Energy Daily (as the editor), National Journal (covering the White House and other beats). It won the Gerald Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency in 1992. This is his 3rd book; the first one, Where They Ain't, was about baseball in the 1890s in Baltimore and Brooklyn (named by GQ as one of the 20 best books of the millennium); the 2nd, The Washington Century, was a 20th century history of Washington through three families. He is now a contributing editor for National Journal and lives in Arlington, Va., inside the Beltway with his wife and has two grown kids.

 

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Sigfluence and its Impact and is Education Working, with John Loase

August 30, 2017

On Wednesday, September 21, 2011, at 12:00 Noon, I will be hosting my show The Advocates on WVOX- 1460 AM, and my guest is John Loase and our subject is a critical look at “Education in America: Is It Working,” and what we can do about it.

Dr. John Loase, a life-long native of Westchester County, is a Professor of Math at Concordia College and served formerly as Professor of Math at SUNY-Westchester Community College. He has had a long career in academics that has spanned decades in both the public and private secondary schools and colleges of Westchester and New York. He has authored over thirty publications including eight interdisciplinary books, including; The Sigfluence Generation and his latest work, Statistics Made Easy,  which was an outgrowth of a National Science Foundation’s sponsored program in Mathematical Modeling, that he directed. He has been an active lecturer and has been involved in numerous workshops on Advanced Statistics, Mathematical Modeling, among other disciplines.

Dr. Loase received a unique Joint Doctorate in Math and Psychology from Columbia University’s Teachers College, after being awarded three Masters Degrees in Math, Counseling, and Psychmetrics from Manhattan College and Columbia University, followed by a sixty credit program that led to permanent certification as School Psychologist from the College of New Rochelle. He has been a member of the following professional organizations: -American Association for Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, Past President, New York State- Thought – Consultant Editor (Fordham University) Chair – Task Force on Poverty in New York State (Commissioned by NYSSCA – branch of American Association for Counseling and Development). Past Vice President New York State Counselor’s Association American Statistical Association New York Academy of Sciences, Mathematical Association of America, Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Mathematics, and the American Psychological Association –Divisions:  Measurement and Humanistic Psychology.

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Freud through Lehrman’s Lens with Lynne Lehrman Weiner and John Weiner

August 30, 2017

 “The Advocates” on WVOX- 1460 AM, on August 16, 2007, will host my guests, Lynne Lehrman Weiner and her husband John.  Lynne, a long-time resident of White Plains and Westchester County, has written a book titled “Freud Through Lehrman’s Lens.” It is about her father Dr. Philip Lehrman, a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, and his year working with Sigmund Freud and the Viennese psychoanalytic community of the late 1920’s and the pre- Nazi era in Austria!

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The Veteran after the Wars with John and Lynne Weiner and Jim Kurtz

August 30, 2017

On the Advocates July 19, 2007, on WVOX-1460 AM, my guests with are John and Lynne Weiner, from White Plains, who is with us in our studio, and Mr. Jim Kurtz, who will join us on phone from his home in Webster, New York. John Weiner, who was born and raised in Livingston Manor, NY and, served honorably in Europe during WWII was discharged as a Captain, is here with his beautiful and brilliant wife Lynne Lehrman Weiner, who has spent a lifetime as an activist, a reporter, homemaker, mother of three and is the author of the book Sigmund Freud Through Lehrman’s Lens, which is being published in English, and will be released within the next month. Her father, Philip Lehrman, a well-known psychiatrist was a student and associate of the famous Sigmund Freud, and she had the pleasure of sitting on the famous Austrian doctor’s lap. John, who taught for many years at the Edgemont High School, was honored by the State of New York, among many others, for his free book program that raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to assist homeless people.

Jim Kurtz, who now resides in Webster, NY, was raised in Mount Vernon, NY, graduated from the Mount Vernon schools and Syracuse University. He volunteered for service in 1967 and served with the 82nd Airborne Division in Vietnam. When he was discharged from service, Jim had been awarded the Bronze Star among his other decorations. He spent his post-war working career, owning a large restaurant in Rochester, NY.  After a hiatus of 15 years he became quite active with Vietnam veterans, which included outreach activities that included dealing with the transitional problems of returning to civilian life, developing a prosthetics factory for land mine victims, and counseling centers for veterans.

 

 

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Interview with Bob Marrone- Host of the WVOX Morning Show- Richard J. Garfunkel talks about FDR

August 30, 2017

Bob Marrone of WVOX interviewed -Riuchard J. Garfunkel on February 18, 2008 on the subject of FDR.

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Women and the Great Changes of the Last 50 years with Gail Collins

August 30, 2017

On Wednesday, November 25, 2009, at 12:00 Noon, I will be hosting my show The Advocates on WVOX- 14 My guest is Gail Collins, columnist and former editorial page editor of the New York Times. Our subject is her just published book, When Everything Changed, the Amazing Journey of American Women, and her views on today’s women and their challenges.

Gail Collins joined The New York Times in 1995 as a member of the editorial board and later as an Op-Ed columnist. In 2001 she became the first woman ever appointed editor of the Times’ editorial page. At the beginning of 2007, she stepped down and began a leave in order to finish her new book: When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present. She returned to The Times as a columnist in July 2007. Before joining The Times, Ms. Collins was a columnist at New York Newsday and the New York Daily News, and a reporter for United Press International. Her first jobs in journalism were in Connecticut, where she founded the Connecticut State News Bureau, which provided coverage of the state capitol and Connecticut politics. When she sold it in 1977, the CSNB was the largest news service of its kind in the country, with more than 30 weekly and daily newspaper chains. Besides When Everything Changed, which was published in October of 2009 by Little, Brown, Ms. Collins is the author of America's Women, Scorpion Tongues: Gossip, Celebrity and American Politics, and The Millennium Book, which she co-authored with her husband, Dan Collins.

Ms. Collins ran the newspaper at her all-girls Catholic school and even published a book of comic monologues at the age of 15. She earned a journalism degree from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1967 and a master's in government from the University of Massachusetts in 1971. In graduate school, she met and married her husband, Dan Collins, now an editor at CBS News. After graduation they moved to Connecticut.

In her early 20s, Collins took a job covering the state legislature in Hartford for The Fair Press, a small weekly in Fairfield County, outside of New York City. When the paper could no longer afford to keep her on, Collins, rather than look for another job, started her own news service called the Connecticut State News Bureau in 1972. After five years and with about 35 subscribers, Collins sold the news service in 1979.

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The Prosecutor and the Art of the Mystery with Linda Fairstein

August 30, 2017

Wednesday, May 25, 2011, at 12:00 Noon, I am hosting my show, The Advocates on WVOX- 1460 AM. My guest is Linda Fairstein, former NYC prosecutor and internationally known writer of mysteries.

Linda Fairstein is an American author and former prosecutor focusing on crimes of violence against women and children. She served as head of the sex crimes unit of the Manhattan District Attorney's office from 1976 until 2002 and is the author of a series of novels featuring Manhattan prosecutor Alexandra Cooper. She graduated with honors from Vassar College (1969) and the University of Virginia School of Law (1972) and joined the Manhattan District Attorney's office in 1972 as an Assistant District Attorney. She was promoted to the head of the sex crimes unit in 1976. During her tenure, she prosecuted several controversial and highly publicized cases, including the "Preppy Murder" case against Robert Chambers in 1986 and the "Central Park Jogger" case in 1990. She left the District Attorney's office in 2002, and has continued to consult, write, lecture and serve as a sex crimes expert for a wide variety of print and television media outlets, including CNN, MSNBC, and Larry King, among others. Ms. Fairstein has consulted for a number of media outlets during a number of high profile prosecutions including Michael Jackson's molestation charges in 2004, Kobe Bryant's sexual assault charges, and Scott Peterson's trial. She was the founder of the Domestic Violence Committee of the New York Women's Agenda. She is a frequent speaker on issues surrounding domestic abuse.

She is the internationally best-selling author of a series of crime novels featuring Manhattan prosecutor Alexandra Cooper. The novels draw on Fairstein's legal expertise as well as her knowledge of and affection for the rich history of the city of New York.

The titles are:

  • Final Jeopardy (1996)
  • Likely To Die (1997)
  • Cold Hit (1999)
  • The Deadhouse (2001) (Nero Award winner)
  • The Bone Vault (2003)
  • The Kills (2004)
  • Entombed (2005)
  • Death Dance (2006)
  • Bad Blood (2007)
  • Killer Heat (2008)
  • Lethal Legacy (2009)
  • Hell Gate (2010)
  • Silent Mercy (March 2011)

She has also written a non-fiction book, Sexual Violence: Our War Against Rape (1993).

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The Defining Moment- FDR’s First Hundred Days with Jonathan Alter

August 30, 2017

Thursday morning, July 26th, at 9:00 am I will be hosting a show called "The Advocates" on WVOX-AM radio, 1460 AM  My guest is the distinguished journalist Jonathan Alter, of Newsweek and a frequent political commentator on NBC and MSNBC. Our topic will be his book "The Defining Moment" The First Hundred Days of the FDR Administration, March 4, 1933.

For a decade in the 1980s, Alter was Newsweek's media critic, where he was among the first in the mainstream media to break tradition and hold other news organizations accountable for their coverage,a precursor to the role later played by blogs. When Newsweek launched his wide-ranging column in 1991, it was the first time the magazine allowed regular political commentary in the magazine, other than on the back page. After the election of Bill Clinton in 1992, during which Alter was a consultant to MTV, he was among a small group of reporters and columnists who had regular access to Clinton, though he was far from a reliable supporter, particularly during the Monica Lewinsky scandal. "Alter bites me in the ass sometimes, but at least he knows what we're trying to do," Clinton was quoted as saying in the book Media Circus by The Washington Post's Howard Kurtz.

Alter gained international notoriety on election night 2000, when on NBC with Tim Russert and Tom Brokaw, he claimed that the election would be settled in court. He was the first pundit to predict the months long recount process.

Two months after the September 11 attacks, Alter wrote an article for Newsweek called "Time to think about torture" which became one of his best-known articles.[15] In the column, he suggested that the U.S. might need to "rethink ... old assumptions about law enforcement". Stating that "some torture clearly works", he suggested the nation should "keep an open mind about certain measures to fight terrorism, like court-sanctioned psychological interrogation", and consider transferring some prisoners to other countries with less stringent rules on torture.

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The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis with Don Blum, A Survivor of our Greatest Naval Loss in WW II.

August 30, 2017

Wednesday, July 1, 2009, at 12:00 Noon, I am hosting my show, The Advocates on WVOX- 1460 AM.  My guest today is Don Blum, from Greenburgh, NY, who is one of the last survivors of the USS Indianapolis, which was the last major capital ship, sunk in World War II. Our subject is his story, what really happened, and who was at fault!

Mr. Blum was born in 1924 and grew up in Scarsdale, where he went to the public schools and graduated from Scarsdale High School in June of 1941. He started at Stevens Institute of Technology that summer for introductory courses in shop and drafting and to get acquainted with the other freshmen. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor occurred on December 7, 1941, many of his classmates left to join the armed forces. Because he was just 17, he was advised to stay in college because he would be more valuable as a trained engineer.  When he turned 18 in '42 he enlisted in the Navy and applied for, and was accepted in, the for V-12 Program. This program was a intense college training for new naval officers to supplement the regular force of commissioned officers already serving the fleet. In June 1943, his program started at the Stevens Institute where he graduated in fall of 1944 and was sent directly to Midshipmen's school at Columbia University.  He graduated in March of 1945 and was sent to the State of Washington to Gunnery School. In the middle of June 1945, he was assigned to USS Indianapolis.  After reporting to the Naval Commandant in San Francisco he was transported to the ship at Mare Island where it was being repaired in dry dock. He reported aboard and was given orders to leave for Ammunition Handling School in Seattle. After three weeks of training he returned to ship and was told that the ship would be leaving next day for places unknown. He was just 21 and had never been to sea before. Thirteen days later he was swimming in the shark-infested waters of the Pacific with hundreds of other survivors and the ship was gone. After being rescued with the remaining survivors, he returned from Pacific theater for 30 day survivor leave. He was then assigned to USS Franklin, a large carrier, located in Brooklyn Navy Yard, while being repaired after being hit by a Kamikaze.  Eventually, with the end of the war, He was discharged. Later on, he was asked to testify at a Courts-Martial trial of the Captain of the Indianapolis.

After his service he joined his father’s small consulting engineering firm and was put to work almost immediately in New York. His brother was released from the Navy about six months before and they both worked together. After almost thirty years in that business, he retired and bought a sailboat and sailed up and down the East Coast.Not long after his extended cruise, but short retirement, he went back to work designing buildings for an old client in the pharmaceutical business and has kept busy ever since. He is still active and is currently working with his son on another engineering endeavor.

 

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